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Console Metadata (Mega-Thread)


In virtute Dei

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Coleco ADAM
 
Release Date: October 1983
 
Developer: Coleco
 
Manufacturer: Coleco
 
Max Controllers: 1
 
CPU: Zilog Z80, 3.58 MHz
 
Memory: 80 KB RAM, 16 KB VRAM, 32 KB ROM
 
Graphics: Texas Instruments TMS9928A
 
Sound: Texas Instruments SN76489AN
 
Display: 256 x 192
 
Media: ROM Cartridge, Floppy
 
Overview:

The Coleco Adam is a home computer, and expansion for the ColecoVision (port 3), released in 1983 by American toy manufacturer Coleco. It was an attempt to follow on the success of the company's ColecoVision video game console. The Adam was not very successful, partly because of early production problems, and was orphaned in early 1985.

 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleco_Adam

Image Source: Viking

 

 

Coleco ADAM.png

Edited by In virtute Dei
Universal Formatting for all Entries, Adding Viking's Platform Set
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Commodore 128

Release Date: January 1985
 
Developer: Commodore Business Machines
 
Manufacturer: Commodore Business Machines
 
Max Controllers: 1
 
CPU: MOS Technology 8502, 2 MHz, Zilog Z80, 4 MHz, and MOS Technology 6502
 
Memory: 128 KB RAM
 
Graphics: MOS 8564/8566 VIC-II
 
Sound: MOS 6581 SID synthesizer chip
 
Display: 160 x 200, 320 x 200
 
Media: Floppy

Overview: 

The Commodore 128, also known as the C128, C-128, C= 128,or occasionally CBM 128, is the last 8-bit home computer that was commercially released by Commodore Business Machines (CBM). Introduced in January 1985 at the CES in Las Vegas, it appeared three years after its predecessor, the bestselling Commodore 64.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_128#Specifications

1024px-Commodore-128.png

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Commodore 64

Overview:

The Commodore 64 is an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore International. It is listed in the Guinness World Records as the highest-selling single computer model of all time, with independent estimates placing the number sold between 10 and 17 million units.Volume production started in early 1982, marketing in August for US$595 (equivalent to $1,461 in 2015). Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20 and Commodore PET, the C64 took its name from its 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of RAM. It had superior sound and graphical specifications compared to other earlier systems such as the Apple II and Atari 800, with multi-color sprites and a more advanced sound processor.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_64

Image Source: Viking

 

Commodore_64.png

Edited by In virtute Dei
Universal Formatting for all Entries, Adding Viking's Platform Set
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@In virtute Dei - Aye, it's perfect. The platform images are great as well, we need those more than anything as the database looks quite empty without them. (although the metadata itself is also awesome :) )

I'll look into uploading all of it in a little bit. I've got a few things on my plate, but this is up there too :). Thanks again! Muchly appreciated!

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Commodore CDTV

Release Date: March 1991
 
Developer: Commodore International
 
Manufacturer: Commodore International
 
Max Controllers: 1
 
CPU: Motorola 68000, 7.16 MHz
 
Memory: 1 MB Amiga Chip RAM
 
Graphics: 12-bit Color Palette
 
Sound: 4 x 8-bit PCM Channels
 
Display: 320 x 200, 320 x 256
 
Media: CD-ROM, Floppy
 
Overview:

The CDTV (an acronym for "Commodore Dynamic Total Vision", a backronym of an acronym for "Compact Disc Television", giving it a double meaning) is a multimedia platform developed by Commodore International and launched in March 1991. The CDTV was intended as a media appliance rather than a personal computer.

 
Image Source: ClownClone

 

cdtv.png.eb7ffd198b1373cb55f205e0da432624.png

Edited by In virtute Dei
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Commodore MAX Machine

Release Date: 1982
 
Developer: Commodore International
 
Manufacturer: Commodore International
 
Max Controllers: 1
 
CPU: MOS Technology 6510, 1.02 MHz
 
Memory: 2 KB RAM
 
Graphics: VIC-II 6566
 
Sound: SID Sound Chip
 
Display: 320 x 200
 
Media: ROM Cartridge
 
Overview:

The Commodore MAX Machine, also known as Ultimax in the United States and VC-10 in Germany, was a home computer designed and sold by Commodore International in Japan, beginning in early 1982, a predecessor to the popular Commodore 64. The Commodore 64 manual mentions the machine by name, suggesting that Commodore intended to sell the machine internationally; however, it is unclear whether the machine was ever actually sold outside Japan. It is considered a rarity.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_MAX_Machine

Image Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_MAX_Machine

 

Commodore_MAX_Machine_(shadow)_(xparent_bg).png

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Commodore PET

Release Date: October 1977
 
Developer: Commodore International
 
Manufacturer: Commodore International
 
Max Controllers: 1
 
CPU: MOS Technology 6502, 1 MHz
 
Memory: 4KB-96KB, Depending on the Model
 
Graphics: TTL Video Circuit
 
Sound: None
 
Display: 40 x 25
 
Media: Cassette Tape, 5.25" Floppy, 8" Floppy
 
Overview:

The Commodore PET (Personal Electronic Transactor) is a line of home/personal computers produced starting in 1977 by Commodore International. A top-seller in the Canadian and United States educational markets, it was Commodore's first full-featured computer, and formed the basis for their entire 8-bit product line, including the Commodore 64. The first model, which was named the PET 2001, was the first personal computer ever made available to retail consumers.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_PET

Image Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_PET#PET_2001_series_.2F_2001-N_.26_-B_series.2C_CBM_3000_series

 

 

 

Commodore_PET2001.png.610685d2dc354393d90e4add6ad46212.png

Edited by In virtute Dei
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Commodore Plus 4

Release Date: 1984

Developer: Commodore International

Manufacturer: Commodore International

Max Controllers: 2

CPU: MOS Technology 8501

Memory: 64 KB RAM, 64 KB ROM

Graphics: MOS Technology TED

Sound: MOS Technology TED

Display: 320 x 200

Media:  ROM Cartridge, Cassette Tape

Overview:

The Commodore Plus/4 is a home computer released by Commodore International in 1984. The "Plus/4" name refers to the four-application ROM resident office suite (word processor, spreadsheet, database, and graphing); it was billed as "the productivity computer with software built-in".  Internally, the Plus/4 shares the same basic architecture as the lower-end Commodore 16 and 116 models, and is able to use software and peripherals designed for them. However, it is not compatible with the well-established Commodore 64.  While the Plus/4 had some success in Europe, it was a failure in the United States, where it was derided as the "Minus/60".

 

Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_Plus/4

Image Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_Plus/4

 

Commodore_Plus_4.png

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Commodore VIC-20

Release Date: 1980/1981

Developer: Commodore International

Manufacturer: Commodore International

Max Controllers: 1

CPU: MOS Technology 6502

Memory: 5 KB RAM, 20 KB ROM

Graphics: MOS Technology VIC 

Sound: 3 Pulse Wave Sound Generators

Display: 176 x 184

Media: ROM Cartridge

Overview:

The VIC-20 (Germany: VC-20;Japan: VIC-1001) is an 8-bit home computer that was sold by Commodore Business Machines. The VIC-20 was announced in 1980,roughly three years after Commodore's first personal computer, the PET. The VIC-20 was the first computer of any description to sell one million units.

 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_VIC-20

Image: Viking

Commodore_VIC-20.png

Edited by In virtute Dei
Universal Formatting for all Entries, Adding Viking's Platform Set
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Elektronika BK

Release Date:  1984

Developer: NPO Scientific Center

Manufacturer: NPO Scientific Center

Max Controllers: 1

CPU: K1801VM1, 3MHz - 4.6MHz (Depending on the Model)

Memory: 32KB

Graphics: K1801VP1-037 VDC

Sound: General Instrument AY-3-8910

Display: 512 x 256

Media: Cassette Tape, Floppy

Overview: 

The Electronika BK was a series of 16-bit PDP-11-compatible Soviet home computers developed by NPO Scientific Center, the leading Soviet microcomputer design team at the time. It was also responsible for the more powerful UKNC and DVK micros. First released in 1984 (developed in 1983), they were based on the К1801ВМ1 (Soviet LSI-11-compatible CPU) and were the only "official" Soviet home computer design in mass production.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronika_BK

Image Source: http://www.ipcm.org.il/_image/table/Elektronika.png

Only Decent One I could find..,

Elektronika.png

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