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In virtute Dei

Console Metadata (Mega-Thread)

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Alright; I've been at it off and on and I'm down to the Hartung Game Master (which also needs a transparent image). I think I've done all I can handle for the day, but hopefully I can get back to this soon guys. Made some progress at least. :)

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15 minutes ago, Jason Carr said:

Alright; I've been at it off and on and I'm down to the Hartung Game Master (which also needs a transparent image). I think I've done all I can handle for the day, but hopefully I can get back to this soon guys. Made some progress at least. :)

Not good enough!!! we expect everything done yesterday and done well.....

Lol well done done Jason its a slog, but in my opinion needs doing, You just know all the new people coming in are going to ask," why does my game boy have no description in it bruv launchbox sux"

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On 8/11/2017 at 8:26 PM, teeedubb said:

Any updates on adding system info to the db? :)

I think it is on the back burner again while some other important things are worked on. Not entirely sure :/ 

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15 hours ago, massatomic said:

@teeedubb@In virtute Dei

the ability to edit system info has been there for a while now, click on the system you want and then go to the details tab, the edit icon will be hidden at the end of the line

Is that in the lb db or the lb app?

I had a look at the database after posting this and its had info populated  for most (all?) systems😀.. now I need to get my lb to pull the updated info.

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I think these consoles are missing from the database, correct?

Benesse Pocket Challenge V2
Commodore 64 (PP)
Commodore 64 (Tapes)
NEC PC Engine SuperGrafx
Nintendo e-Reader
Nintendo Game Boy Advance (e-Cards)
Nintendo Sufami Turbo
Sega Master System Mark III
Sinclair ZX Spectrum +3
Tiger Gizmondo
VTech V.Smile

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4 minutes ago, mirko@annese.eu said:

 

I think these consoles are missing from the database, correct?

Benesse Pocket Challenge V2
Commodore 64 (PP)
Commodore 64 (Tapes)
NEC PC Engine SuperGrafx
Nintendo e-Reader
Nintendo Game Boy Advance (e-Cards)
Nintendo Sufami Turbo
Sega Master System Mark III
Sinclair ZX Spectrum +3
Tiger Gizmondo
VTech V.Smile

Most of, if not all of those are not specifically systems, they are variations of the same hardware. and things like Nintendo Game Boy Advance (e-Cards) arent systems at all.

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Commodore 64 (PP) is for "preservation project" - which are .nib files. They're really not designed to be used for emulation (I have no idea why those are so commonly distributed) - they do nothing with most C64 emulators, and even if you convert them into an emulator-usable format, most of them still won't work anyway from copy protection. The C64 Preservation Project was designed to catalog C64 games in their original form (including copy protection) and facilitate the creation of new disks (as in, actual 5 1/4 floppy disks) with additional tools they released. It's not a separate platform (it's just Commodore 64) and it's not something you can really even use with emulators.

Commodore 64 (Tapes) is literally just another format some games came in (for the same system). Commodore 64 had tapes, cartridges, and disks. It's not something separate, it's still just Commodore 64.

Commodore-1531-Datasette-Tape-Drive-1024x834.jpg

1200px-1541-ratopi.jpg

600px-Commodore-64-Computer-BL.jpg

(cartridges plugged directly into the back of the C64)

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3 hours ago, Zombeaver said:

Commodore 64 (PP) is for "preservation project" - which are .nib files. They're really not designed to be used for emulation (I have no idea why those are so commonly distributed) - they do nothing with most C64 emulators, and even if you convert them into an emulator-usable format, most of them still won't work anyway from copy protection. The C64 Preservation Project was designed to catalog C64 games in their original form (including copy protection) and facilitate the creation of new disks (as in, actual 5 1/4 floppy disks) with additional tools they released. It's not a separate platform (it's just Commodore 64) and it's not something you can really even use with emulators.

Commodore 64 (Tapes) is literally just another format some games came in (for the same system). Commodore 64 had tapes, cartridges, and disks. It's not something separate, it's still just Commodore 64.

 

cartridges plugged directly into the back of the C64)

The Commodore 64 PP files are what come included in the no-intro set, and I'm equally puzzled why these were chosen instead of more convenient formats such as d64, prg, etc.

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6 hours ago, bundangdon said:

The Commodore 64 PP files are what come included in the no-intro set

Yeah I know, I'm just saying I don't understand why. As I said, these do nothing in their native .nib format in all major C64 emulators (they "work" natively in this format in micro64, but most will end up still being unusable from copy protection), and even if you go to the trouble of converting them to g64 format with nibtools, the majority of them still won't work due to copy protection. They are not intended to be used in emulators. Most of the time when they get mentioned it's combined with an understandably confused "What am I supposed to do with these?", to which I can only say "Get rid of them and grab the Gamebase64 set." No Intro and TOSEC are both terrible for C64. TOSEC at least has usable formats, but it often has 5 or 6 dumps for every game and 50%+ of those are bad dumps, so it's a giant mess.

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Posted (edited)

Tiger Handheald Eletronics

Tiger is most well known for their low-end handheld gaming systems with LCD screens. Each unit contains a fixed image printed onto the handheld that can be seen through the screen. Static images then light up individually in front of the background that represent characters and objects, similar to numbers on a digital clock. In addition to putting out some of its own games, Tiger was able to secure licenses from many of the day's top selling companies to sell their own versions of games such as Street Fighter II, Sonic 3D Blast, and Castlevania II: Simon's Quest. Later, Tiger introduced what they called "wrist games". These combined a digital watch with a scaled-down version of a Tiger handheld game.

 

Tiger-Handheld-Eletronics---Clear-Logo.pngTiger-Handheld-Game.png

Edited by Hyommi
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